ADHERENCE TO IRON CONSUMPTION IN PREGNANCY

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Nur Alviatussyamsiah
Aulia Putri Sandy
Ferina Ferina

Abstract

Background: Anemia during pregnancy has significant adverse effects for the mother and fetus which can lead to premature birth, postpartum hemorrhage, poor cognitive development, and low birth weight for the baby. Data shows that 53.4% ​​of pregnant women in Africa, 36.1% in Ethiopia, and 37.1% in Indonesia are anemic. Iron supplementation given during pregnancy is an effective way to reduce the incidence of anemia in pregnant women. However, in practice pregnant women often do not adherence with the rules for consuming iron tablets. There are several factors that impact the adherence of pregnant women, including the level of education, family support, gestational age at the first pregnancy visit, and knowledge about anemia


Methods: This review article is a literature study from seven articles regarding adherence to iron consumption in pregnancy research journals from Ethiopia, Tanzania, Uganda, and Indonesia. Articles obtained by accessing sciencedirect, elsevier, pubmed, and google search engines with keywords compliance, anemia, iron supplementation, pregnancy.


Results: Based on the results of studies from several literatures, strengthening and promoting health education, increasing awareness by counseling and monitoring the administration of iron tablets in health facilities is very important to increase the level of adherence to iron supplementation in pregnant women.


Conclusion: Based on the results of studies from several literatures, strengthening and promoting health education, increasing awareness by counseling and monitoring the administration of iron tablets in health facilities is very important to increase the level of adherence to iron supplementation in pregnant women.

References

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2. Triharini M, Nursalam, Sulistyono A, Adriani M, Armini NKA, Nastiti AA. Adherence to iron supplementation amongst pregnant mothers in Surabaya, Indonesia: Perceived benefits, barriers and family support. Int J Nurs Sci. 2018;5(3):243-248. doi:10.1016/j.ijnss.2018.07.002
3. World Health Organization. Guideline: Daily Iron and Folic Acid Supplementation in Pregnant Women.; 2012.
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6. Nasir BB, Fentie AM, Adisu MK. Adherence to iron and folic acid supplementation and prevalence of anemia among pregnant women attending antenatal care clinic at Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital, Ethiopia. PLoS One. 2020;15(5):1-11. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0232625
7. Molla T, Guadu T, Muhammad EA, Hunegnaw MT. Factors associated with adherence to iron folate supplementation among pregnant women in West Dembia district, northwest Ethiopia: A cross sectional study. BMC Res Notes. 2019;12(1):1-6. doi:10.1186/s13104-019-4045-2
8. Fouelifack FY, Sama JD, Sone CE. Assessment of adherence to iron supplementation among pregnant women in the yaounde gynaeco-obstetric and paediatric hospital. Pan Afr Med J. 2019;34:1-8. Doi:10.11604/pamj.2019.34.211.16446

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